Spare room for spare parts?

Do you carry spare parts in your RV? Well, you should. Let’s talk about why, and what parts you should have readily available.

The spare parts you carry will vary on a number of factors, like if you’re in a motorhome, or towing a trailer, what level of mechanical comfort you have, or the age and type of vehicle you’re in. People can do anything they put their mind to, and with blogs (like mine!) youtube, Facebook groups, and other self-help information readily available, anything is possible.

Coach:
Whether you’re in a motorhome of some kind, or towing a trailer, the area you live in is known as the coach, and you should carry a spare anything that’s essential to comfortable living. This will vary, but here’s some stuff I carry:
Spare fuses for the breaker panel (DC) so I can replace them if they blow. Small, inexpensive, and super easy to do, make sure you get the right size(s) you need, as well as an assortment of various amperage ratings.
Spare bulbs, for both inside and outside. I want to see, and be seen, so pull a couple of bulbs out, write down the numbers on them, or take them to your local auto parts store (I’m a big fan of AutoZone!) to pick up some spares. Most of the lights inside will be the same bulb, but make sure you check them all just to know what you’re up against.
Spare shower faucet. If i’m doing some kind of road-side repair, or I get stuck somewhere, my shower is the ONE faucet I will have to have. No matter how big or small the mess is, I can clean it off of me with the shower faucet, and carry on being a happy camper, even if i’m stuck in the middle of nowhere.
Water pump. I cannot stress this enough; if you’re out camping without hookups (or with hookups, and the park water is turned off for any reason) your water pump is invaluable! Of course, it means nothing to until it stops working… CARRY A SPARE! Also, don’t throw the old one away right away, a lot of them can be rebuilt for much less than buying a new one.
Water hose. Carry a spare water hose, in addition to your usual clean and gray water hoses, just in case. If your primary hose breaks and you need water in your RV, you’ll thank me for having a spare hose.
Pressure regulator. You should have one of these with a gauge so you can see what the pressure is, and adjust it if you want to. For a spare, carry one without a gauge, just in case. There’s nothing worse than pulling into a park, looking forward to a nice long shower, and finding out you’ll need a regulator to bring their 80 PSI water supply down to your rig’s max of 55 (except for not knowing, and blowing out a water line or fitting!).
Sewer connection. Carry a spare hose, a spare connection for each end, and two spare hose clamps. Even if it’s just a cheap 10′ hose, it’s still better than no hose when yours breaks, or worse, when you forgot to stow it before you left the park this morning… 400 miles ago.

 

For your tow rig (or motorhome chassis), I suggest:
Spare fan belt. Even on a brand new rig, some piece of highway debris can get kicked up, put a slice in your belt, and then POOF! you’re stranded because of a belt. Yes, I know, pantyhose work in a pinch, but a spare belt is way better, and works every time. Make sure to carry the tool(s) you need to change it, and learn how to change it by doing it twice. Yes, twice.
Fuses and bulbs. Just like in the coach, fuses and bulbs can be lifesavers on the road; see and be seen!
Tape. One roll each of electrical, gorilla, and flex seal just to cover all the bases. You might be amazed at what you can do with these!
Spare fluids for older vehicle are always good to have; oil, trans fluid, coolant, and washer fluid are all good things to have on hand, and can even be helpful in a newer vehicle if you run into minor issues on the road.
Zip ties. Yes, zip ties. Buy a small assortment pack, put them in your ‘uh-oh’ box, and hope you never need them. When things go sideways and you need to hold that thingy right there so it won’t rub on the doo hickey, zip tie it.

 

There’s always more stuff to think about, but the key idea is to carry a small amount of a variety of stuff so you can craft something that’ll get you to the next safe place when things go sideways. Other than the fan belt, don’t worry about getting the best, the most expensive, or the exact right one, just have some stuff that will get the job done, and remember; i’m only an email away 😉

Here I go, off to tow!

Quick note about towing versus pulling:

Just because your rig can PULL it doesn’t mean it can TOW it.
Towing generally refers to CONTROLLING a trailer, so it’s not just about getting it going, it’s also about slowing it, turning it, moving it around, and stopping it.
Why does this matter? Because if you can’t control what you’re towing, then you’re not towing, you’re pulling a collision looking for a place to happen.

#don’tbethatguy

 

Non-Commercial weigh

Anytime you want to know the total weight of your rig, all you need to do is go to your local truck stop!
Park somewhere (in a designated space!), walk inside, and ask someone at the fuel desk for a “non-commercial” weigh ticket. This let them know that you’re not a Commercial driver, and they’ll log it differently in their system. Commercial drivers have to provide Truck, Trailer, and load numbers, along with Company name and other stuff, which you won’t have since you’re personal use.
After they give you the okay, go back to your rig, and drive slowly onto the scale, lining up in the center (left to right), and making sure your axle sets are in different sections of the scale. If you stop with the speaker/microphone box just outside your drivers window, you should be fine, and you can ask for a little help over the speaker/mic to get adjusted correctly.

Once you’ve settled down, they’ll let you know they’ve got your weight, so clear the scale (ALWAYS DRIVE SLOWLY on the scale!), park, and go get your ticket inside!

W&M 1: What’s it all mean?

When we’re talking about a house on wheels, it’s important to understand all the different terms used to talk about weight; what they mean, how to use them, and why they matter.

First things first, here’s some terms you need to know:

1) GVWR: Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
This is the total amount of weight your vehicle is designed to carry, and going over this amount is a recipe for disaster.
This applies to any single vehicle, so you’ll have one for your truck (or tow vehicle), another for your trailer, or one for your motorhome.
2) GCWR: Gross Combined Weight Rating
This is the total amount of weight your vehicle can weigh in combination with another vehicle, such as when you’re towing a trailer. If you’re towing a trailer, then you’d want to make sure your GVWR of your truck, plus the GVWR of your trailer, is NOT more than the GCWR for your tow vehicle.
3) GAWR: Gross Axle Weight Rating
This is the total amount of weight a single axle can support. Not as common, but worth noting here.
4) Towing Capacity
This is the maximum towing capacity for your vehicle, or the maximum amount of weight it can tow.
5) Curb (dry) weight
Curb weight is how much your vehicle weighs dry and empty (sitting on the curb). Think of this as how much your vehicle weighs without stuff, people, fuel, water, luggage, so on and on and on…
6) Tongue Weight
On your tow vehicle, this is how much weight you can put on the tongue of the vehicle, which is different than the total weight of the trailer.
On your trailer, this is how much weight should be on the tongue of the trailer, which is different than the weight placed on the wheels.

Okay, now that we have some terms down, let’s add one more section, weights per gallon:
1) Water weighs 8.3 lbs per gallon at 62°F, and
2) Gasoline weighs 6.3 lbs per gallon, and,
3) Propane weighs 4.2 lbs per gallon, and,
4) These weights vary with temperature because the mass changes with density.

The reason these numbers matter is because vehicles (all vehicles) are designed with specifications, and so long as they are used inside those specifications, they will operate as intended, as tested, and as certified. Anytime you operate a vehicle outside of its specifications, you run the risk of causing damage to the vehicle, losing control of the vehicle, or other troubles.

Read on in the following posts to learn more about Weights and Measures.

 

Right of way

Right of way is a fun topic (for me) to discuss, but so often it seems to be misconstrued by people who want it to be about feelings, rather than facts (a whole ‘nother series covered in another category).

Right of way has nothing to do with WHO is right, letting people in, ‘being nice’, or ‘polite driving’, but everything to do with which driver is supposed to do what, according to the rules of the road. The reason this matters is that we don’t have a readily available way to discuss these things from behind the wheel, so it’s important we all know, and follow, the rules of the road.

Right of way simply means which driver has which responsibility, based on position and situation. An example is at an intersection with a four-way stop; each driver has a responsibility to come to a complete stop, and then each driver has a responsibility to proceed through the intersection in a timely fashion when it is their ‘turn’. It’s also important not to block an intersection, as this causes congestion.

Another point about Right of Way is that it doesn’t just pertain to automobiles, but to anyone using any form of public walkway or roadway, which includes pedestrians, bicycles, motorcyclists, buses, trucks, and all other vehicles.

While the laws in your state may be a little different from some other states, here are some general rules of the road dealing with right of way:
1) ALWAYS yield to emergency vehicles. Police, Fire, Medical, Public Service, or other emergency vehicles should always have the right of way when their lights are flashing, their siren is sounding, or both. This does not mean you have to stop, pull off the road, or cause a collision, you are simply required to YIELD to emergency vehicles with activated lights, siren(s), or both. A great example of this is that if an emergency vehicle is travelling the opposite direction from you, and you will not impede their travel (they have no need to use your lane to get around other vehicles) then you don’t have to make any changes, you can simply keep travelling along as you are not, nor will you, impede their travel in any way.
2) ALWAYS yield to pedestrians!
In a pedestrian vs vehicle collision, the pedestrian ALWAYS loses, because the vehicle does not give way like human tissue or bone does. It’s not a ‘fair fight’ in any way, and the easiest way to prevent that type of collision is to simply yield to pedestrians. People standing about in the roadway, outside of marked crosswalks, are NOT pedestrians, but care should still be taken to avoid injuring them if possible.
3) KEEP IT MOVING.
My single greatest frustration in driving with the general public is that so many times, they fail to keep it moving. People will gawk, jerk, search, make sudden movements, fail to look before moving, and a long list of other things that create issues; all of that falls under ‘failing to drive’, and should be avoided at all times while operating a motor vehicle.
When you’re driving, keep it moving! At an intersection, take your turn when it’s your turn so traffic can keep moving. On the roadway, keep up with the flow of traffic, and don’t impede traffic whenever possible. If you’re lost, find someplace to pull off, stop, figure it out, and then get back on the roadway. On the freeway/interstate, use the proper lane, and keep it moving!

 

Further reading:
https://driversed.com/driving-information/signs-signals-and-markings/right-of-way.aspx
http://www.safemotorist.com/articles/right_of_way.aspx