Non-Commercial weigh

Anytime you want to know the total weight of your rig, all you need to do is go to your local truck stop!
Park somewhere (in a designated space!), walk inside, and ask someone at the fuel desk for a “non-commercial” weigh ticket. This let them know that you’re not a Commercial driver, and they’ll log it differently in their system. Commercial drivers have to provide Truck, Trailer, and load numbers, along with Company name and other stuff, which you won’t have since you’re personal use.
After they give you the okay, go back to your rig, and drive slowly onto the scale, lining up in the center (left to right), and making sure your axle sets are in different sections of the scale. If you stop with the speaker/microphone box just outside your drivers window, you should be fine, and you can ask for a little help over the speaker/mic to get adjusted correctly.

Once you’ve settled down, they’ll let you know they’ve got your weight, so clear the scale (ALWAYS DRIVE SLOWLY on the scale!), park, and go get your ticket inside!

W&M 1: What’s it all mean?

When we’re talking about a house on wheels, it’s important to understand all the different terms used to talk about weight; what they mean, how to use them, and why they matter.

First things first, here’s some terms you need to know:

1) GVWR: Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
This is the total amount of weight your vehicle is designed to carry, and going over this amount is a recipe for disaster.
This applies to any single vehicle, so you’ll have one for your truck (or tow vehicle), another for your trailer, or one for your motorhome.
2) GCWR: Gross Combined Weight Rating
This is the total amount of weight your vehicle can weigh in combination with another vehicle, such as when you’re towing a trailer. If you’re towing a trailer, then you’d want to make sure your GVWR of your truck, plus the GVWR of your trailer, is NOT more than the GCWR for your tow vehicle.
3) GAWR: Gross Axle Weight Rating
This is the total amount of weight a single axle can support. Not as common, but worth noting here.
4) Towing Capacity
This is the maximum towing capacity for your vehicle, or the maximum amount of weight it can tow.
5) Curb (dry) weight
Curb weight is how much your vehicle weighs dry and empty (sitting on the curb). Think of this as how much your vehicle weighs without stuff, people, fuel, water, luggage, so on and on and on…
6) Tongue Weight
On your tow vehicle, this is how much weight you can put on the tongue of the vehicle, which is different than the total weight of the trailer.
On your trailer, this is how much weight should be on the tongue of the trailer, which is different than the weight placed on the wheels.

Okay, now that we have some terms down, let’s add one more section, weights per gallon:
1) Water weighs 8.3 lbs per gallon at 62°F, and
2) Gasoline weighs 6.3 lbs per gallon, and,
3) Propane weighs 4.2 lbs per gallon, and,
4) These weights vary with temperature because the mass changes with density.

The reason these numbers matter is because vehicles (all vehicles) are designed with specifications, and so long as they are used inside those specifications, they will operate as intended, as tested, and as certified. Anytime you operate a vehicle outside of its specifications, you run the risk of causing damage to the vehicle, losing control of the vehicle, or other troubles.

Read on in the following posts to learn more about Weights and Measures.

 

Right of way

Right of way is a fun topic (for me) to discuss, but so often it seems to be misconstrued by people who want it to be about feelings, rather than facts (a whole ‘nother series covered in another category).

Right of way has nothing to do with WHO is right, letting people in, ‘being nice’, or ‘polite driving’, but everything to do with which driver is supposed to do what, according to the rules of the road. The reason this matters is that we don’t have a readily available way to discuss these things from behind the wheel, so it’s important we all know, and follow, the rules of the road.

Right of way simply means which driver has which responsibility, based on position and situation. An example is at an intersection with a four-way stop; each driver has a responsibility to come to a complete stop, and then each driver has a responsibility to proceed through the intersection in a timely fashion when it is their ‘turn’. It’s also important not to block an intersection, as this causes congestion.

Another point about Right of Way is that it doesn’t just pertain to automobiles, but to anyone using any form of public walkway or roadway, which includes pedestrians, bicycles, motorcyclists, buses, trucks, and all other vehicles.

While the laws in your state may be a little different from some other states, here are some general rules of the road dealing with right of way:
1) ALWAYS yield to emergency vehicles. Police, Fire, Medical, Public Service, or other emergency vehicles should always have the right of way when their lights are flashing, their siren is sounding, or both. This does not mean you have to stop, pull off the road, or cause a collision, you are simply required to YIELD to emergency vehicles with activated lights, siren(s), or both. A great example of this is that if an emergency vehicle is travelling the opposite direction from you, and you will not impede their travel (they have no need to use your lane to get around other vehicles) then you don’t have to make any changes, you can simply keep travelling along as you are not, nor will you, impede their travel in any way.
2) ALWAYS yield to pedestrians!
In a pedestrian vs vehicle collision, the pedestrian ALWAYS loses, because the vehicle does not give way like human tissue or bone does. It’s not a ‘fair fight’ in any way, and the easiest way to prevent that type of collision is to simply yield to pedestrians. People standing about in the roadway, outside of marked crosswalks, are NOT pedestrians, but care should still be taken to avoid injuring them if possible.
3) KEEP IT MOVING.
My single greatest frustration in driving with the general public is that so many times, they fail to keep it moving. People will gawk, jerk, search, make sudden movements, fail to look before moving, and a long list of other things that create issues; all of that falls under ‘failing to drive’, and should be avoided at all times while operating a motor vehicle.
When you’re driving, keep it moving! At an intersection, take your turn when it’s your turn so traffic can keep moving. On the roadway, keep up with the flow of traffic, and don’t impede traffic whenever possible. If you’re lost, find someplace to pull off, stop, figure it out, and then get back on the roadway. On the freeway/interstate, use the proper lane, and keep it moving!

 

Further reading:
https://driversed.com/driving-information/signs-signals-and-markings/right-of-way.aspx
http://www.safemotorist.com/articles/right_of_way.aspx

 

 

Sort it out

I approach dating the same way I approach sales, solving problems, or finding the right part; i’m not here to make every single option work, i’m simply here to sort, which is why I have a system.

Until i’ve met you, spent time with you, gotten to know you, I don’t have much information to work with, so when it appears that i’m being led on (or jerked around), I go ahead and sort that person into the ‘not now’ category. Maybe they’re busy, maybe they’re not interested, maybe they’re a terrible person, maybe maybe maybe…. The goal of sorting is to separate the potential matches who are willing to meet from everyone else, and then spend my time with people that matter.

This is another reason why i’m not interested in ‘texting’ for weeks or months on end, and why i’m all about the meeting. I’ve dated all over the country in the past few years, and while there’s flakes all over, there seems to be an abundance of them here in the Southeast.

Quick recap: If my profile and my blog aren’t enough for you to decide to meet me, then we’re all done, and life goes on. See? Simple. 🙂