Spare room for spare parts?

Do you carry spare parts in your RV? Well, you should. Let’s talk about why, and what parts you should have readily available.

The spare parts you carry will vary on a number of factors, like if you’re in a motorhome, or towing a trailer, what level of mechanical comfort you have, or the age and type of vehicle you’re in. People can do anything they put their mind to, and with blogs (like mine!) youtube, Facebook groups, and other self-help information readily available, anything is possible.

Coach:
Whether you’re in a motorhome of some kind, or towing a trailer, the area you live in is known as the coach, and you should carry a spare anything that’s essential to comfortable living. This will vary, but here’s some stuff I carry:
Spare fuses for the breaker panel (DC) so I can replace them if they blow. Small, inexpensive, and super easy to do, make sure you get the right size(s) you need, as well as an assortment of various amperage ratings.
Spare bulbs, for both inside and outside. I want to see, and be seen, so pull a couple of bulbs out, write down the numbers on them, or take them to your local auto parts store (I’m a big fan of AutoZone!) to pick up some spares. Most of the lights inside will be the same bulb, but make sure you check them all just to know what you’re up against.
Spare shower faucet. If i’m doing some kind of road-side repair, or I get stuck somewhere, my shower is the ONE faucet I will have to have. No matter how big or small the mess is, I can clean it off of me with the shower faucet, and carry on being a happy camper, even if i’m stuck in the middle of nowhere.
Water pump. I cannot stress this enough; if you’re out camping without hookups (or with hookups, and the park water is turned off for any reason) your water pump is invaluable! Of course, it means nothing to until it stops working… CARRY A SPARE! Also, don’t throw the old one away right away, a lot of them can be rebuilt for much less than buying a new one.
Water hose. Carry a spare water hose, in addition to your usual clean and gray water hoses, just in case. If your primary hose breaks and you need water in your RV, you’ll thank me for having a spare hose.
Pressure regulator. You should have one of these with a gauge so you can see what the pressure is, and adjust it if you want to. For a spare, carry one without a gauge, just in case. There’s nothing worse than pulling into a park, looking forward to a nice long shower, and finding out you’ll need a regulator to bring their 80 PSI water supply down to your rig’s max of 55 (except for not knowing, and blowing out a water line or fitting!).
Sewer connection. Carry a spare hose, a spare connection for each end, and two spare hose clamps. Even if it’s just a cheap 10′ hose, it’s still better than no hose when yours breaks, or worse, when you forgot to stow it before you left the park this morning… 400 miles ago.

 

For your tow rig (or motorhome chassis), I suggest:
Spare fan belt. Even on a brand new rig, some piece of highway debris can get kicked up, put a slice in your belt, and then POOF! you’re stranded because of a belt. Yes, I know, pantyhose work in a pinch, but a spare belt is way better, and works every time. Make sure to carry the tool(s) you need to change it, and learn how to change it by doing it twice. Yes, twice.
Fuses and bulbs. Just like in the coach, fuses and bulbs can be lifesavers on the road; see and be seen!
Tape. One roll each of electrical, gorilla, and flex seal just to cover all the bases. You might be amazed at what you can do with these!
Spare fluids for older vehicle are always good to have; oil, trans fluid, coolant, and washer fluid are all good things to have on hand, and can even be helpful in a newer vehicle if you run into minor issues on the road.
Zip ties. Yes, zip ties. Buy a small assortment pack, put them in your ‘uh-oh’ box, and hope you never need them. When things go sideways and you need to hold that thingy right there so it won’t rub on the doo hickey, zip tie it.

 

There’s always more stuff to think about, but the key idea is to carry a small amount of a variety of stuff so you can craft something that’ll get you to the next safe place when things go sideways. Other than the fan belt, don’t worry about getting the best, the most expensive, or the exact right one, just have some stuff that will get the job done, and remember; i’m only an email away 😉

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